Lyrebird: Remarkable crazy Bird call ! [ MUST WATCH ]

Creativity in noises, creativity in natures consciousness.

If you haven’t heard the Lyrebird before, hear its bizzare yet wonderful noises which makes you think, how alien and strange the natural world can really be.

” A lyrebird is either of two species of ground-dwelling Australian birds, that form the genus, Menura, and the family Menuridae. They are most notable for their superb ability to mimic natural and artificial sounds from their environment. As well as their extraordinary mimicking ability, lyrebirds are notable because of the striking beauty of the male bird’s huge tail when it is fanned out in display; and also because of their courtship display. Lyrebirds have unique plumes of neutral-coloured tailfeathers and are among Australia’s best-known native birds.

The lyrebird is capable of imitating almost any sound and they have been recorded mimicking human sounds such as a mill whistle, a cross-cut saw, chainsaws,[9] car engines and car alarms, fire alarms, rifle-shots, camera shutters, dogs barking, crying babies, music, mobile phone ring tones, and even the human voice. However, while the mimicry of human noises is widely reported, the extent to which it happens is exaggerated and the phenomenon is quite unusual.[3]

A lyrebird’s song is one of the more distinctive aspects of its behavioural biology. Lyrebirds sing throughout the year, but the peak of the breeding season, from June to August, is when they sing with the most intensity. During this peak they may sing for four hours of the day, almost half the hours of daylight. The song of the superb lyrebird is a mixture of seven elements of its own song and any number of other mimicked songs and noises. The lyrebird’s syrinx is the most complexly-muscled of the Passerines (songbirds), giving the lyrebird extraordinary ability, unmatched in vocal repertoire and mimicry.

The superb lyrebird’s mimicked calls are learned from the local environment, including from other superb lyrebirds. An instructive example of this is the population of superb lyrebirds in Tasmania, which have retained the calls of species not native to Tasmania in their repertoire, but have also added some local Tasmanian endemic bird noises. It takes young birds about a year to perfect their mimicked repertoire. The female lyrebirds of both species are also mimics, and will sing on occasion but the females do so with less skill than the males.[3] A recording of a superb lyrebird mimicking sounds of an electronic shooting game, workmen and chainsaws was added to the National Film and Sound Archive’s Sounds of Australia registry in 2013.[10] ” – wikipedia.

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4 Responses to Lyrebird: Remarkable crazy Bird call ! [ MUST WATCH ]

  1. probyngregory . says:

    Hi Linda Had heard the lyrebird sing but never saw one do so– I loved when he/she turned to the camera and made the gunshot sounds, obviously doing something he/she thought the humans might find dangerous and maybe stop bugging him/her by filming! happy Halloween! xo Probyn p.s. Finn had his first trick or treat tonight in Sierra Madre where they do it a day early. He got tired of competing for candy (retail street setting) and wanted to go home after not too long.

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  2. Linda Sky says:

    I’ve never seen or heard this bird before, truly amazing! Sounds like he or she had been watching Star Wars 🙂 Happy Halloween to Finn! Why did he have to compete for candy, don’t they just hand it out? Anyway have a good one!

    Like

  3. Reblogged this on Willow Andreasson's Journey Into The Mysteries of Life and commented:
    Our gorgeous Mother Nature never ceases to amaze me… welcome to the divine Lyrebird 🙂 Thank you to the wonderful Linda Sky for sharing this article with us ❤

    Like

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